You’re ‘Tidying Up,’ and Pittsburgh thrift stores are expecting a boom.

Also: Where to donate everything Marie Kondo won’t let you keep

At the Animal Lifeline Pittsburgh Thrift Store, "truckloads" of donations have been dropped off in the past two weeks.

At the Animal Lifeline Pittsburgh Thrift Store, "truckloads" of donations have been dropped off in the past two weeks.

Courtesy of Lynda Manko
Rossilynne Culgan

Perhaps your Instagram feed is filled with photos of neatly rolled towels and perfectly folded T-shirts, or maybe your partner dumped all of their clothing onto the bed to sort and determine which items spark joy.

It seems like just about everybody is “Tidying Up” right now, inspired by organization mastermind Marie Kondo’s Netflix show of the same name, which debuted Jan. 1. Kondo, author of the The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up, asserts that only items that spark joy should be kept, one principle of her KonMari Method.

But what happens to everything that doesn’t spark joy, like all of the clothes that are voted off of clothes mountain?

Many items, it seems, are headed to thrift stores around Pittsburgh — and across the nation, per CNN, which recorded “a small wave” of people donating items. But locally and nationally, it’s hard to quantify exactly how much impact Kondo has made versus typical New Year clean-ups.